Sensory

In the context of FND, sensory resources focus on sensory processing difficulties (hearing, vision, taste, smell, or touch), low and high sensory  registration (including where hypersensitivity triggers involuntary spasms or non-epileptic seizures).  This section also focuses on interoception, propriception and vestibular inputs.

Noise Cancelling Headphones
Image credit: sony.com.au For some people with FND, sensory input can make their symptoms worse... including triggering involuntary spasms or non-epileptic seizures, affecting physical and cognitive fatigue.  Noisy environments are quite tiring for me and at their worst can affect my cognition, speech and voluntary moment. I've been using Loops Experience Plus for quite awhile when I'm out and about but sometimes they aren't quite enough. (You can read our post on Loops here) Wh…
Loop Earplugs (Loops)
Image credit: au.loopearplugs.com Many people with FND become more sensitive to sound. Some people can be triggered by loud or unexpected noises. Others find that busy environments such as a shopping centre or a pub can cause sensory overload. In such situations, filtering out the unwanted noise can be extremely difficult. One possible solution is loop earplugs (loops). Loop earplugs help you avoid sensory overload by reducing annoying or loud sounds.There are different loops available for…
Quiet Hour at your local Coles and Woolworths supermarkets
Image credit: Woolworths Group. If you have high sensory registration and struggle with the sensory onslaught of loud PA announcements, crashing trolleys, changes in temperature, smells from the bakery, deli, butcher, seafood and gardening sections, staff with their large oversized cages parked in aisles in the way filling shelves that you have to carefully manoeuvre around, then you might find the "Quiet Hour" offered by supermarket giants Coles and Woolworths appealing. Woolworths doesn'…
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